Casas Monumentales – Terque

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Terque

The little towns and villages in the valleys of the rios Nacimiento and Andarax boast some beautiful old houses. These were mostly built during the 19th Century when the area became wealthy from the production of table grapes and oranges. I remember, 55 years ago, when my father had a greengrocer’s shop in Falmouth, his customers would eagerly await the arrival of grapes from Almeria in September. I had little idea at the time where Almeria was and never thought that I would one day live where these grapes were actually grown. Sadly, production has virtually died off with agriculture being concentrated in the massive and profitable greenhouses on the coastal plains.
The village of Terque in particular has some fine old buildings.

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Terque from the Rio Andarax

Terque is only a 20 minute walk along the banks of the Andarax from our cortijo which is just above the confluence of the Nacimiento and Andarax. Both rivers at this point carry no water so they are easy to cross and make good walking routes. This morning, we strolled up to Terque and Digby took some photos of the beautiful buildings there.

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Plaza de Constitución, Terque

In the Plaza de Constitución, where a few locals were taking an early coffee under the magificent old old elm tree, there are some attractive buildings.

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Casas Monumentales

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Up a narrow street

From the Plaza, narrow streets lead past some fine houses.

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Elaborate ironwork

Most of these houses are well-maintained which must be expensive as the ironwork and masonry is elaborate.

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Bougainvillea and jasmine

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Rincon with jasmine

Bougainvillea and jasmine are frequently found in corners and growing up walls, adding to the colour and fragrance of the village.

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Se Vende

Not all houses are in good repair. This old building in the Plaza Adelfas is waiting for a new owner but, as the telephone number on the for sale sign has faded, the wait has already been long.

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Old door

This is a typical, old wooden door which Digby thought made an interesting study of colour and texture.

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Casa monumental

This is one of the largest and finest of the old houses. Intricate iron and plaster work surround the doors and windows. The white shutter alone must be expensive and time -consuming to maintain.

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The house overlooking its walled garden

Looking back at this house you can see a beautiful large window overlooking the garden and griffons at the railings along the roof.

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Houses in a small plaza, Terque

There is a lot more to see and write about around here so keep reading.

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About Margaret Merry

I grew up in Falmouth, Cornwall, England where, after leaving Falmouth High School, I spent a year at Falmouth School of Art. Then followed three years at Hornsey College of Art in London where I obtained a Diploma in Art and Design. I then spent a post-graduate year at the West of England College of Art in Bristol where I gained an Art Teacher?s Diploma and a Certificate in Education of the University of Bristol. I lived and worked in Truro for over 30 years and became one of Cornwall's most popular artists. My paintings have been exhibited in New York, Tokyo, Paris and London and have been bought by collectors from all over the world. I have published 4 books which became local bestsellers - 'The Natural History of a Westcountry City', 'Margaret Merry's Cornish Garden Sketchbook', 'Sea & Sail' and 'Tidal Reaches'. In 2002 I moved to Spain and now live pn a small farmer the town of Alhabia in the Alpujarra Almeriense in the Province of Almeria. I now get my inspiration from the dramatic scenery of Andalucia and its old cities, towns and villages which I usually capture in watercolour. I also enjoy portraiture and figurative art, particularly nudes and dancers. For these paintings I use artists' soft pastels. I have written and illustrated 3 children's books - The Wise Old Boar, The Lonely Digger and The Adventure of Princess The Pony - which have been published in the USA.
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2 Responses to Casas Monumentales – Terque

  1. Sarah Ball says:

    Wow what a lovely area, congratulations on your move. Keep the pictures coming. Sarah and Trevor.

  2. angela Bell says:

    Raul Tapiz took Steve and I to the Naciemento of the Andarax and to a lot of the villages. Wonderful places.

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