Barranco del Negro

Barranco del Negro

Barranco del Negro

Yesterday a howling gale raged over Southern Spain. We are relatively sheltered from the north west wind in Las Negras but the winds were still strong here and it was a relief to wake up to a calmer day and our customary blue skies. We decided to treck up the Barranco del Negro, walk across the ridge and descend to La Isleta down the Barranco del Poraise. We parked in the space off the road between the Mirador de la Ametista and the village of La Isleta by the track leading down to Cala de Las Roros.

Looking down from the Barranco del Negro

Looking down from the Barranco del Negro

Across the road the track up the barranco is clearly marked. It is a steep ascent but looking back there are good views down to the coast.

Palmettos along the path

Palmettos along the path

As we walked up we did not see much of interest to botanists but many hardy palmettos thrive here.

Narcissi

Narcissi

However, we did find these pretty little narcissi growing beside the path.

Daisy and Blanquita find water

Daisy and Blanquita find water

Below the path, Blanquita and Daisy found pools of fresh water.

Crystals in a rock

Crystals in a rock

The geology is always interesting in the Parque Natural. The quartz crystals were in a rock just by the path.

Through the pines

Through the pines

It is a long, steep climb to the top and just before the summit the path passes through a grove of pine trees.

Almost there

Almost there

After over an hour’s climb we eventually reached the top of the ridge about 350 metres above sea level.

Abandoned cortège and olive tree

Abandoned cortège and olive tree

The first building you will see here is this derelict old cortijo.

Two villas from the roof of the first

Two villas from the roof of the first

We can understand why this would have been abandoned but nearby are three unfinished villas.

Villa Poseidon

Villa Poseidon

Apparently, these were built illegally by a German and consequently the work was stopped and the houses left to rot.

Looking down to Rodalquilar and El Playazo from the terrace of the middle villa

Looking down to Rodalquilar and El Playazo from the terrace of the middle villa

Wonderful views but no services, completely exposed to the elements and so isolated that to reach the nearest village would take over 20 minutes in a 4×4.

Looking down to Los Escullos

Looking down to Los Escullos

From here a track follows along the ridge and then descends down to the coast. From the top there are great views towards Los Escullos.

La Isleta del Moro

La Isleta del Moro

As we descend La Isleta comes into view.

Daisy on the direct route

Daisy on the direct route

We left the main track to take the most direct route across country down to La Isleta.

La Isleta del Moro

La Isleta del Moro

When we arrived at the village we were hoping to take a short break and refresh ourselves with a drink and tapas but our favourite bar was closed and the two restaurants open were only serving lunches.

Beach at La isleta

Beach at La isleta

We had no choice but to head back to the car along the path by the beautiful beaches ….

Grove of palm trees

Grove of palm trees

…. and through this grove of palm trees. We had been going for almost 5 hours.

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About Margaret Merry

I grew up in Falmouth, Cornwall, England where, after leaving Falmouth High School, I spent a year at Falmouth School of Art. Then followed three years at Hornsey College of Art in London where I obtained a Diploma in Art and Design. I then spent a post-graduate year at the West of England College of Art in Bristol where I gained an Art Teacher?s Diploma and a Certificate in Education of the University of Bristol. I lived and worked in Truro for over 30 years and became one of Cornwall's most popular artists. My paintings have been exhibited in New York, Tokyo, Paris and London and have been bought by collectors from all over the world. I have published 4 books which became local bestsellers - 'The Natural History of a Westcountry City', 'Margaret Merry's Cornish Garden Sketchbook', 'Sea & Sail' and 'Tidal Reaches'. In 2002 I moved to Spain and now live in the little coastal village of Las Negras in the heart of the Parque Natural de Cabo de Gata. I now get my inspiration from the dramatic scenery of Andalucia and its old cities, towns and villages which I usually capture in watercolour. I also enjoy figurative art, particularly nudes and dancers. For these paintings I use artists' soft pastels. I have written and illustrated 3 children's books - The Wise Old Boar, The Lonely Digger and The Adventure of Princess The Pony - which have been published in the USA.
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One Response to Barranco del Negro

  1. Thys Wim says:

    We plan to do the same walk today!

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