Barrancos of Las Negras

Barranco Aires de Las Negras

Barranco Aires de Las Negras

Now that we have cooler weather we can enjoy long walks during the middle of the day and the barrancos of Las Negras which lead up into the mountains behind our village are ideal for rambling.
Fig trees and agave in Barranco Aires de Las Negras

Fig trees and agave in Barranco Aires de Las Negras

During the spring, when the wild flowers are out, they make wonderful nature walks; even now, in December, the mountain scenery and the colours of the landscape, enhanced by the clear winter light, are enough to delight. In the barranco, Aires de Las Negras, which runs below our house all the way up to Las Hortichuelas Altas, the leaves on the fig trees are changing colour, creating an autumnal mood. Photos taken on Friday.
Bottom Barranco de Las Agüillas

Bottom Barranco de Las Agüillas

On Friday, we walked up the Barranco de las Agüillas which leads inland from the edge of the village, starting at the junction with the cliff path to San Pedro.
Fig trees in Barranco de Las Agüillas

Fig trees in Barranco de Las Agüillas

Here again fig trees line the rambla.
Evergreen oak tree

Evergreen oak tree

This evergreen oak is all that is standing in the fields of this abandoned farm.
Ruins of a cortijo

Ruins of a cortijo

There are many ruins of old farmhouses along this walk. Sometimes only the arch, which would have been in the centre of the main living area, remains standing.
Barranco de Las Negras

Barranco de Las Negras

Yesterday we walked up the Barranco de Las Negras. This branches up to the left at the bottom of the Barranco de Las Agüillas.
Cortijo overlooking Barranco de Las Negras

Cortijo overlooking Barranco de Las Negras

This south-facing cortijo, overlooking the bottom of the barranco, has one of the best locations in Las Negras.
Water in the barranco

Water in the barranco

The Barranco de Las Negras is the only one with water permanently trickling down it.
Greenery at the bottom of the barranco

Greenery at the bottom of the barranco

Because of the plentiful water supply, the vegetation at the bottom is quite lush and much greener than the other barrancos.
Cane and almond trees

Cane and almond trees

Tall grasses, cane and almond trees were flourishing here.
Cortijo del Barranco de Las Negras

Cortijo del Barranco de Las Negras

We went as far as this spot where we were looking down on an old cortijo which could only be reached by this track. It did not appear to be occupied, but there were signs that it had been squatted in, probably by hippies in the summer.

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About Margaret Merry

I grew up in Falmouth, Cornwall, England where, after leaving Falmouth High School, I spent a year at Falmouth School of Art. Then followed three years at Hornsey College of Art in London where I obtained a Diploma in Art and Design. I then spent a post-graduate year at the West of England College of Art in Bristol where I gained an Art Teacher?s Diploma and a Certificate in Education of the University of Bristol. I lived and worked in Truro for over 30 years and became one of Cornwall's most popular artists. My paintings have been exhibited in New York, Tokyo, Paris and London and have been bought by collectors from all over the world. I have published 4 books which became local bestsellers - 'The Natural History of a Westcountry City', 'Margaret Merry's Cornish Garden Sketchbook', 'Sea & Sail' and 'Tidal Reaches'. In 2002 I moved to Spain and now live in the little coastal village of Las Negras in the heart of the Parque Natural de Cabo de Gata. I now get my inspiration from the dramatic scenery of Andalucia and its old cities, towns and villages which I usually capture in watercolour. I also enjoy figurative art, particularly nudes and dancers. For these paintings I use artists' soft pastels. I have written and illustrated 3 children's books - The Wise Old Boar, The Lonely Digger and The Adventure of Princess The Pony - which have been published in the USA.
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2 Responses to Barrancos of Las Negras

  1. What a lovely place for a walk!

  2. Angela says:

    I love the photos and how amazing to see water trickling down. This landscape is so beautiful and unique everytime you post pics I dream of cabo da Gata in the night.

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